Sega: The Creative Years-Part 4

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A common theme throughout this series of articles has been the presence of Sonic Team, and once again they feature here. This surely highlights the incredibly talented and inventive studio that they once were, before losing several key members (including Yuji Naka), and succumbed to churning out near endless sub-standard Sonic the Hedgehog titles with neither a whit of quality control or indeed, effort. However, fourteen years ago, this was not the case, and after giving Sega a flagship Sonic title in the form of Sonic Adventure (his first and best 3D outing), and the brilliant puzzle game, Chu Chu Rocket, they served up another forward thinking piece of game design, with the incredible, Phantasy Star Online.

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The Weight of Expectations… and Souls

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Expectations are a dangerous thing, especially in videogames, just ask the likes of Bungie or Valve. Bungie struggled to maintain the high standard set for themselves with Halo: Combat Evolved – the game that launched the original Xbox – famously revealing how after a year into development of Halo 2 they had to scrap their entire graphics engine as well as large sections of the game. As for Valve, after having released Half-Life 2 in November 2004 to universal acclaim, we’re yet to hear any official news on the inevitable Half-Life 3, almost ten years on.

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Camelot: A Model of Modernity

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I have been writing a lot recently about the many creative and technical successes that Sega had throughout the tenure of their last two home consoles, and this-coupled with the recent discussion of the Mass Effect series-brought me towards the interesting, yet only recently celebrated option, of importing a save file into a game in order to impart some level of influence upon the overall story arc. I cannot state for certain when this was first implemented, or by whom, but as far as I am concerned, the first instance of its successful implementation occurred way back in 1998 in a criminally underrated, yet seminal RPG for the Sega Saturn. This feature, that was the impetus for my train of thought, is one of the key components that initially made Mass Effect such a wonderful concept, and the recipient of substantial critical acclaim. Spurred on by this, I naturally wanted to revisit this landmark RPG title, so that I might see how well it stands up today.

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Review-Child of Light

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Arriving with very little fanfare, Ubisoft Montreal’s modern day fairy tale, Child of Light, emerges on all platforms into an industry dominated by repetitive first person shooters and tiresome annual updates, to offer gamers something entirely different. It is an artistic and dreamlike RPG adventure that’s unlike anything else on this year’s release schedule, a refreshing change for those hungry for something more in their video games, and perhaps best of all, it’s also very, very good…

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Kingdom Come: Deliverance

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Warhorse Studios may not be an entirely familiar name to most gamers, but this is a team not just full of fine heritage, but the bold ambition to sculpt their debut RPG out of real life events, to abscond the typical fantasy fare of magic and dragons in favour of intricate and intelligent swordplay, full scale battles and a visually stunning depiction of 15th century Europe. Kingdom Come may very well be the most intriguing new IP in gaming for some considerable time, and along with its creators, Low Fat Gaming would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to the real world…

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South Park: The Stick Of Truth

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Are we entering an era of good licensed games? After Rocksteady’s triumphant (so far) Arkham series, publishers are (hopefully) waking up to the fact that if you give good developers enough time with a license they genuinely have affection for, they’ll come up with a game worth your money. South Park: The Stick Of Truth is proof of that, it says here…

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